Fact Sheet

Aug. 6 – 12, 2007
Crooked Stick Golf Club
Carmel, Ind.

HISTORY: The U.S. Women’s Amateur is one of the United States Golf Association’s original three championships. It was first conducted in 1895, shortly after the inaugural U.S. Amateur and U.S. Open. The Women’s Amateur has since been conducted every year except 1917-18, when it was temporarily suspended because of World War I, and 1942-45, when it was suspended because of World War II.

PAR & YARDAGE: Yardage for the Crooked Stick Golf Club will be set at 6,595 yards, par 72.

Holes 1-9, 3,302 yards, par 36

Hole 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Total
Yards 348 384 167 408 587 148 372 395 493 3,302
Par 4 4 3 4 5 3 4 4 5 36

Holes 10-18, 3,293 yards, par 36

Hole 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Total
Yards 360 502 407 142 418 455 404 193 412 3,293
Par 4 5 4 3 4 5 4 3 4 36

ARCHITECT: Opened in 1964, the course was designed by Pete Dye. Crooked Stick is hosting its fifth USGA championship. It also hosted the 1991 PGA Championship, won by John Daly, and the 2005 Solheim Cup Matches.

COURSE SET-UP

Fairways – Cut to ½ inch
Tees and collars of greens – Cut to 3/8 inch
Putting greens – Prepared to be firm and fast to measure approximately 10 ½ to 11 feet on the USGA Stimpmeter
Intermediate rough – Cut to 1 ½ inches, approximately 6 feet wide along fairways
Primary rough – Cut to 2 ½ to 3 inches
Player courtesy walks – Cut to 1 ½ inches, approximately 6 feet wide
The Championship set-up results in a new USGA Course Rating ™ of 78.8 and a Slope Rating ® of 143.

FORMAT: The Women’s Amateur is conducted with 36 holes of stroke-play qualifying. The low 64 scorers then advance to match play, with the champion determined by a 36-hole match-play final.

CHAMPIONSHIP SCHEDULE:

  • Monday (Aug. 6) – First round, stroke play (18 holes)
  • Tuesday (Aug. 7) – Second round, stroke play (18 holes). After conclusion of the 36 holes, the field will be cut to the low 64 scorers, who will advance to match play.
  • Wednesday (Aug. 8) – First round, match play (18 holes)
  • Thursday (Aug. 9) – Second round, match play (18 holes); Third round, match play (18 holes)
  • Friday (Aug. 10) – Quarterfinals, match play (18 holes)
  • Saturday (Aug. 11) – Semifinals, match play (18 holes)
  • Sunday (Aug. 12) – Final, match play (36 holes)

WHO CAN ENTER: The championship is open to female amateurs who have USGA handicap indexes not exceeding 5.4.

ENTRIES: When entries closed June 20, a record 935 entries were accepted by the USGA. The previous record was 873 in 2005. Qualifying was held at 18 sites from July 5-19.

THE CHAMPION RECEIVES:

  • A gold medal and custody of the Robert Cox Cup for the ensuing year.
  • A 10-year exemption from sectional qualifying for future U.S. Women’s Amateur Championships.
  • A 10-year exemption from sectional qualifying for future U.S. Women’s Mid-Amateur Championships, if otherwise eligible.
  • A 10-year exemption from sectional qualifying for future U.S. Women’s Amateur Public Links Championships, if otherwise eligible.
  • An exemption from local and sectional qualifying for the next two U.S. Women’s Open Championships, if still an amateur.
  • An exemption from local qualifying for future U.S. Women’s Open Championships, if still an amateur.
  • An exemption from sectional qualifying for future USGA Senior Women’s Amateur Championships, if otherwise eligible.

2006 RECAP: Kimberly Kim, 14, of Hilo, Hawaii, became the youngest champion in the 111-year history of the championship when she rallied to defeat 26-year-old Katharina Schallenberg of Germany, 1 up, at Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club’s Witch Hollow Course in North Plains, Ore. Kim was the youngest winner since 16-year-old Laura Baugh in 1971.

Down five holes through the 15th hole of the morning 18 of the scheduled 36-hole final, Kim did not take her first lead until the 30th hole. On the 36th and final hole, Schallenberg holed a 25-foot birdie putt from the fringe to force Kim to make her 5-foot birdie putt, which she did to secure the title.

"I was shaking so much," said Kim of the final putt. "I don’t even know where I aimed or anything. I just, like, hit it. It’s like, whatever, just hit it."

It was the end of a fruitful summer in USGA competitions for Kim. In June, she was the runner-up at the U.S. Women’s Amateur Public Links Championship in Pueblo, Colo., and she was the youngest to make the cut (one of four amateurs) at the U.S. Women’s Open at historic Newport (R.I.) Country Club.

Kim now looks to become the first back-to-back Women’s Amateur champion since Kelli Kuehne in 1995-96.

EXEMPT PLAYERS – There are 35 players fully exempt into the field for the 2007 U.S. Women’s Amateur Championship. They are (with exemption categories in parenthesis):

Amanda Blumenherst, Scottsdale, Ariz. – 2006 USA Curtis Cup team; 2006 U.S. Women’s Open (made cut); 2007 U.S. Women’s Open
Meghan Bolger, Oxford, Miss. – 2006 U.S. Women’s Mid-Amateur Champion; 2007 U.S. Open qualifier
Carolyn Creekmore, Dallas, Texas – Special Exemption
Lindy Duncan, Daytona Beach, Fla. – 2006 U.S. Women’s Amateur semifinalist
Courtney Ellenbogen, Blacksburg, Va. – 2007 U.S. Women’s Open qualifier
Virginia Grimes, Meridian, Miss. – 2006 USA Curtis Cup team
Mina Harigae, Monterey, Calif. – 2007 U.S. Women’s Amateur Public Links Champion; 2007 U.S. Women’s Open qualifier; 2006 U.S. Women’s Amateur Round of 16; 2006 USA Curtis Cup team alternate
Vicky Hurst, Melbourne, Fla. – 2007 U.S. Women’s Open qualifier
Ha-Na Jang, Korea – 2007 U.S. Women’s Open qualifier; 2006 U.S. Women’s Amateur Round of 16
Tiffany Joh, San Diego, Calif. – 2006 U.S. Women’s Amateur Public Links Champion
Ayaka Kaneko, Honolulu, Hawaii – 2006 U.S. Women’s Amateur quarterfinalist; 2007 U.S. Girls’ Junior runner-up
Danielle Kang, Oak Park, Calif. – 2007 U.S. Women’s Open qualifier
Kimberly Kim, Hilo, Hawaii – 2006 U.S. Women’s Amateur Champion; 2006 USA Women’s World Amateur Team Championship
Diane Lang, Weston, Fla. – 2006 USGA Senior Women’s Amateur Champion
Jennie Lee, Henderson, Nev. – 2006 USA Curtis Cup team; 2006 USA Women’s World Amateur Team Championship; 2006 U.S. Women’s Amateur Round of 16; 2007 U.S. Women’s Open qualifier
Joanne Lee, San Carlos, Calif. – 2007 U.S. Women’s Open qualifier
Stacy Lewis, The Woodlands, Texas – 2006 U.S. Women’s Amateur semifinalist; 2007 U.S. Women’s Open qualifier; 2007 NCAA Division I individual champion
Tiffany Lua, Rowland Heights, Calif. – 2007 U.S. Women’s Open qualifier
Sydnee Michaels, Temecula, Calif. – 2007 U.S. Women’s Open qualifier; 2006 U.S. Women’s Amateur Round of 16
Rikako Morita, Japan – 2006 Women’s World Amateur Team Championship top eight
Azahara Munoz, Spain – 2006 Women’s World Amateur Team Championship top eight
Jennifer Osborn, Huntington Beach, Calif. – 2006 U.S. Women’s Amateur Round of 16
Kristen Park, Buena Park, Calif. – 2007 U.S. Girls’ Junior champion
Jane Rah, Torrance, Calif. – 2006 USA Curtis Cup team alternate
Ashley Rollins, Austin, Texas – 2007 U.S. Women’s Open qualifier
So Yeon Ryu, Korea – 2006 Women’s World Amateur Team Championship top eight
Katharina Schallenberg, Germany – 2006 U.S. Women’s Amateur runner-up
Anna Schultz, Rockwall, Texas – 2006 USGA Senior Women’s Amateur runner-up
Thuhashini Selvaratnam, Sri Lanka – 2006 U.S. Women’s Mid-Amateur runner-up
Jennifer Song, Korea – 2007 U.S. Women’s Open qualifier
Jenny Suh, Fairfax, Va. – 2006 USA Curtis Cup team
Alexis Thompson, Coral Springs, Fla. – 2007 U.S. Women’s Open qualifier
Marci Turner, Tompkinsville, Ky. – 2007 U.S. Women’s Open qualifier
Maria Jose Uribe, Colombia – 2007 U.S. Women’s Open qualifier; 2006 U.S. Women’s Amateur Round of 16
Alison Whitaker, Australia – 2006 U.S. Women’s Amateur Round of 16; 2005 U.S. Women’s Amateur semifinalist

PAST CHAMPIONS: Glenna Collett Vare, with six victories (1922, ’25, ’28, ‘29, ’30, ’35) leads the list of past Women’s Amateur champions, followed by JoAnne Gunderson Carner with five (1957, ’60, ’62, ’62, ‘68. Patty Berg (1938), Babe Zaharias (1946), Louise Suggs (1947), Marlene Stewart Streit (1956), Anne Quast (1958, ’61 ’63), Barbara McIntire (1959, ’64), Catherine Lacoste (1969), Carol Semple Thompson (1973), Beth Daniel (1975, ’77), Juli Inkster (1980, ’81, ’82), Pat Hurst (1990), Wendy Ward (1994), Grace Park (1998), Dorothy Delasin (1999), and Jane Park (2004).

WELCOME BACK TO CROOKED STICK: This will be the fifth USGA championship hosted by Crooked Stick. The previous USGA championships at the club are: 1982 U.S. Junior Amateur (won by Rick Marik); 1983 USGA Senior Amateur (won by William Hyndman III); 1989 U.S. Mid-Amateur (won by James Taylor); and the 1993 U.S. Women’s Open (won by Lauri Merten). The club will also serve as host of the 2009 U.S. Senior Open from July 30-August 2.

INDIANA AND THE USGA: The state of Indiana is hosting its 15th USGA championship and only its second Women’s Amateur. The first Women’s Amateur was played at Meridian Hills C.C. in Indianapolis and was won, 2 and 1, by Marlene Stewart over Joanne Gunderson (who became Joanne Carner).

TELEVISION COVERAGE: Television coverage of the championship begins with the first round of match play on The Golf Channel (All times EDT).

Aug. 8 First Round 4-7 p.m.
Aug. 9 Second and Third Rounds 4-7 p.m.
Aug. 10 Quarterfinals 2-5 p.m.
Aug. 11 Semifinals 11 a.m.-2 p.m.
Aug. 12 Final 2-5 p.m.

GROUPINGS AND STARTING TIMES: Groupings and starting times will be posted on the USGA’s Web site at www.usga.org prior to the championship. Complete coverage and feature stories from the championship will be available on the USGA Web site, www.usga.org.

FUTURE WOMEN’S AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIPS: The 2008 U.S. Women’s Amateur will be conducted at Eugene Country Club in Eugene, Ore., Aug. 4-10. The 2009 championship will be held at Old Warson Country Club in St. Louis, Mo., Aug. 3-9 and the 2010 championship will be played at Charlotte (N.C.) Country Club, Aug. 9-15.

USGA COMMUNICATIONS/MEDIA RELATIONS CONTACTS: Prior to the championship contact Rhonda Glenn at (352) 347-1932 or Pete Kowalski at (908) 234-2300 or 908-216-8435.

 
Championship Facts

U.S. Women's Amateur

HISTORY:The U.S. Women’s Amateur is one of the United States Golf Association’s original three championships. It was first conducted in 1895, shortly after the inaugural U.S. Amateur and U.S. Open. The Women’s Amateur has since been conducted every year except 1917-18, when it was temporarily suspended because of World War I, and 1942-45, when it was suspended because of World War II.

PAR & YARDAGE: Yardage for the Crooked Stick Golf Club will be set at 6,595 yards, par 72.

ARCHITECT: Opened in 1964, the course was designed by Pete Dye. Crooked Stick is hosting its fifth USGA championship. It also hosted the 1991 PGA Championship, won by John Daly, and the 2005 Solheim Cup Matches.

COURSE SETUP
Fairways – Cut to ½ inch
Tees and collars of greens – Cut to 3/8 inch
Putting greens – Prepared to be firm and fast to measure approximately 10 ½ to 11 feet on the USGA Stimpmeter
Intermediate rough – Cut to 1 ½ inches, approximately 6 feet wide along fairways
Primary rough – Cut to 2 ½ to 3 inches
Player courtesy walks – Cut to 1 ½ inches, approximately 6 feet wide
The Championship setup will result in a new USGA Course Rating ™ of 78.8 and a Slope Rating ® of 143.

FORMAT: The Women’s Amateur is conducted with 36 holes of stroke-play qualifying. The low 64 scorers then advance to match play, with the champion determined by a 36-hole match-play final

CHAMPIONSHIP SCHEDULE:

  • Monday, Aug. 6 – First round, stroke play (18 holes)
  • Tuesday, Aug. 7 – Second round, stroke play (18 holes). After conclusion of the 36 holes, the field will be cut to the low 64 scorers, who will advance to match play.
  • Wednesday, Aug. 8 – First round, match play (18 holes)
  • Thursday, Aug. 9 – Second round, match play (18 holes). Third round, match play (18 holes)
  • Friday, Aug. 10 – Quarterfinals, match play (18 holes)
  • Saturday, Aug. 11 – Semifinals, match play (18 holes)
  • Sunday, Aug. 12 – Final, match play (36 holes)

 

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