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Interview With Semifinalist Jennifer Song

BETH MURRISON:  We have Jennifer Song who earned a hard-fought win today in the quarterfinals.  Can you talk a little bit about your match today?

            JENNIFER SONG:  We both had a lot of a tough time.  Both of our shots were not that great and we were not playing our best game, so it turned out obviously that I had a little bit more luck today and my bad day was a little better than hers.   Stephanie is a great player and I played with her during AJGAs and I just felt bad for her that it turned out this way.

            BETH MURRISON:  Can you go through some up-and-downs of the match?  There seemed to be some times where you were playing pretty well, and then had some more difficult moments as the match went on.

            JENNIFER SONG:  Yeah, I stopped quite a bit of shots in the afternoon.  Like 14, the long par 4, we both made bogeys there, but after that par 5, Stephanie made a great second shot, so she was next to the green and she made a birdie and I made a par.

            It's like before that, we were just up and down the whole time.  It was very tough, like I didn't make, I don't think I made a lot of up-and-downs today.  And my putts weren't going in and hers weren't going in either.

            BETH MURRISON:  Is there anything you want to work on before your semifinal match tomorrow?

            JENNIFER SONG:  First I would like to work with my driver because I've been hitting bad drivers this whole weekend, like the past few tournaments.  I wasn't hitting it solidly, but today in the afternoon, I'm just going to work on like rhythm, tempo, and do a little bit of fundamentals.  And obviously I'm going to putt a little more and see some balls going in the hole and get some confidence so I could play great tomorrow.

            BETH MURRISON:  You have some history here this week, have you started thinking about this, winning another USGA title in the same season?

            JENNIFER SONG:  Yeah, I read the article last night, Pearl Sinn did that in 1988, and that was obviously in my head but I'm not thinking about that right now.  I'm just trying to play one match at a time and whatever is in front of me.

            Q.  Did you feel like it was your "A" game today?

            JENNIFER SONG:  It was like a B-minus game.  I wasn't happy about it.  My shots were just all over the place, and I just told myself that, Jennifer, if you're not hitting great, just get up there, swing confidently and that's all you can do today.  It just turned out well today.

            Q.  What does that tell you when if it is your B-minus game, you're not really hitting on all cylinders playing your best, but yet you still come out with a win.  What do you take from that?

            JENNIFER SONG:  I just think that golf is such a sensitive game that even though if you're not playing great, the other opponent might not be playing well.

            So you really don't know what the outcome will be.  You just have to try hard until the whole event is over.

            Q.  If something's not working, is there something that you can fall back on, where you say:  I know I'm a good putter, I'm going to make some putts, or I know I can chip my way out of some trouble, is there one particular part of the game that you really, is a good crutch for you?

            JENNIFER SONG:  I think I'm a good putter.  Like I keep telling myself, Jennifer, you know, just since you always have the right mind, some days it will go in, so just be patient and just wait for it.

            Q.  Are you tired at all?  You've been going nonstop for quite a while now.

            JENNIFER SONG:  Yeah, I'm kind of tired.  But probably hopefully I'll get some rest after this event, like I'll go to Korea for a weekend, just rest and see my swing coach and check up on little things and I'll be back to school.

            Q.  Are you different as a player coming in here because you won a USGA Championship, say, than you would have been a year ago?  Is your attitude coming into an event as a USGA winner different?

            JENNIFER SONG:  No I think to be as humble as I can.  I don't tell myself, hey, you're a champion of a USGA event.  You're just one of every other player, so just play your own game.  I just try to stay focused and just be happy about what I'm doing.

            Q.  How well do you know Tiffany, and what do you expect from your match tomorrow?

            JENNIFER SONG:  I don't think I've ever played with her before in a match or anything.  But obviously I think she's a great player.  I've talked with her a lot in the dining area and she's a nice girl, so I think as always we are going to have a lot of fun.

            Q.  Were you listening to some [Bob] Rotella?

            JENNIFER SONG:  Yeah, I still do that.  That's like my routine in the morning.  I'll get up and pop on the Rotella CD and just listen to it and he just soothes me.

            Q.  Is it always the same section of Bob Rotella?  Is he always saying the same thing?

            JENNIFER SONG:  Coach calls me Bob Rotella's descendant, because I always listen to track 17 where he summarizes like ten things I need to remember to play great golf.  So I listen to that all the time when I get like to the clubhouse, but before then, I try to shuffle around other tracks so I'm not listening to the same one every day.

            Q.  What's the CD called?

            JENNIFER SONG:  Bob Rotella Play Great, Mind of a Golfer, I don't know.  There's a lot of series.  I've read his books and now I have his CD.

            Q.  So is it like ten things, or is this one thing that you've kind of honed in on this summer?  Is there anything in particular?

            JENNIFER SONG:  Well, I pretty much remember all ten.  No. 1 is play to play great, and No.2 is, no, I don't remember No. 2.  But No. 10 is love your putter and your short game, and No. 9 is like be your best friend every second on the golf course.  So I try to be my own best friend myself.

            Q.  Is the pressure off you, finished second last year, you said that you were a little bit frustrated by the near misses.

            JENNIFER SONG:  Yeah, even though I had a lot of near misses, that gave me a lot of confidence, telling me that, Jennifer you can be up there, you can be in contention any time.  And as long as I play my own game and just stay in a positive mine, I think I'm ready.

            Q.  Did you play any FUTURES event?  What were your impressions of life on the FUTURES TOUR?

            JENNIFER SONG:  My dad kind of told me that, you know, Jennifer, even though you're a golfer, you sort of have to have a different life that could balance out your golf cycle and your regular life cycle, and I thought that really, when I went to the FUTURES Tour, I really felt it.  I felt that I need something else that to bring happiness other than playing golf, too, such as like going to, I realize that they had like Bible studies in the LPGA, so that could be important in my life.  I could go out and like watch movies and hang around with different friends and maybe serve in the community services and I think that would be important.

            Q.  Have you had any chance to do anything in town?

            JENNIFER SONG:  Yeah, right before this event, I went to the Gateway Arch and went all the way up to the top and saw the downtown.  And I went to Forest Park and went to the museums there.  I saw a lot of nice drawings.  Yeah, it was really nice.

            Q.  Did you enjoy it?

            JENNIFER SONG:  Yeah, I enjoyed it.

            Q.  And you said you've been to Washington University, as well?

            JENNIFER SONG:  Yeah.

            Q.  This week?

            JENNIFER SONG:  Before this week.

            Q.  What's the toughest stretch of holes you've played so far this week?  Where have you struggled?

            JENNIFER SONG:  I think No. 4.  That's definitely hard.  And I wasn't hitting great drivers, so I wasn't really confident getting off of the tee box, but hopefully I'll have a lot of confidence tomorrow when I get up there.

 

 

 
Championship Facts

U.S. Women's Amateur

HISTORY: The U.S. Women’s Amateur is one of the United States Golf Association’s original three championships. It was first conducted in 1895, shortly after the inaugural U.S. Amateur and U.S. Open. The Women’s Amateur has since been conducted every year except 1917-18, when it was temporarily suspended because of World War I, and 1942-45, when it was suspended because of World War II.

PAR & YARDAGE: Old Warson Country Club will play at 6,422/6,468 yards and par of 35-36—71.

ARCHITECT: Old Warson Country Club was designed by Robert Trent Jones Sr. and opened in 1954.

COURSE SET-UP –The USGA Course Rating® for the Women’s Amateur Championship at Old Warson Country Club is 78.1 and USGA Slope Rating® is 140.

Tees and fairways, height of grass – 7/16 inch

Collars, height of grass – 0.2 inch

Putting greens, speed – 11.5-12 feet on USGA Stimpmeter

Intermediate Rough – 1.25 inches (3 feet width)

Primary Rough – 3 inches

FORMAT: The U.S. Women’s Amateur is conducted with 36 holes of stroke-play qualifying. The low 64 scorers then advance to match play, with the champion determined by a 36-hole match-play final.

WHO CAN PLAY: The U.S. Women’s Amateur Championship is open to female amateurs who have a USGA Handicap Index not exceeding 5.4.

ENTRIES: A total of 955 contestants entered the 2009 championship. The record of 969 was set in 2006.

 

 
 

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